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A project bringing science to Kenyan schools, led by Dr Alun Davis from Kemri Wellcome Trust Research Programme in Kenya and Nuffield Department of Medicine, has won a Project Award in this year’s Vice-Chancellor’s Public Engagement with Research Awards.

The announcement was made at an awards ceremony at Keble College, Oxford on 10th July, hosted by Vice-Chancellor Professor Louise Richardson.

Our students don’t have African scientists to look up to” is a frequently-heard remark. As such, a School Engagement Programme was established enabling students and teachers across Kenyan schools to interact with scientists.

The initial pilot began in 2009 with just three schools. Ten years on and working with local communities and stakeholders has ensured these engagement activities are locally owned and culturally appropriate. Now over 2000 students and 100 teachers in over 50 Kenya schools take part with 60 participating researchers.

Read more (Centre for Tropical Medicine & Global Health, Nuffield Department of Medicine website) 

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