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Glox Therapeutics, a company pioneering the development of precision antibiotics to combat antimicrobial resistance, has raised £4.3M in early-stage funding to develop effective targeted therapeutics against antibiotic-resistant gram-negative bacteria.

antibiotics © Shutterstock

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a major public health crisis throughout the world. It is estimated that around 1.27 million people per year die as a result of AMR due to the therapeutic failure of available antibiotics.

By 2050, AMR is predicted to surpass 10 million deaths globally per year at a cost of $100 trillion, and there is an urgent need to develop new effective antimicrobial therapeutics.

Glox Therapeutics is developing precision antibiotics by using engineered protein bacteriocins. These novel antimicrobials exhibit remarkable potency and specificity, enabling them to effectively and selectively target gram-negative pathogens that have already developed AMR.#

Read the full story on the University of Oxford website.

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